NanoES

quantum


August 2, 2019

Defects Wanted; Apply Here – Q&A with physicist Kai-Mei Fu

NanoES faculty member and professor of electrical engineering and physics recently sat down with APS Physics. Kai-Mei studies the properties of atomic defects in materials with the goal of using these normally unwanted flaws to create quantum technologies for secure communication. She is also the co-chair of QuantumX, a University of Washington initiative seeking to facilitate and support activities that will accelerate quantum discoveries and technologies


June 1, 2019

Seminar: Applications of quantum computing with Jeremy Hilton of D-Wave Systems

NanoES, in partnership with the QuantumX Initiative and the Northwest Quantum Nexus, is hosting Jeremey Hilton from the Vancouver based quantum computing company D-Wave Systems on June 6th.


May 3, 2019

Researchers take a bottom-up approach to synthesizing microscopic diamonds for bioimaging, quantum computing

NanoES faculty member Peter Pauzauskie and his team discovered that they can use extremely high pressure and temperature to introduce other elements into nanodiamonds, making them potentially useful in cell and tissue imaging, as well as quantum communications and quantum sensing. This work was done in collaboration with the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and published in Science Advances on May 3.


March 21, 2019

UW, Microsoft, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory establish new Northwest Quantum Nexus for a quantum revolution in science, technology

Mary Lidstrom at the Quantum Summit

The UW has deep roots in quantum research and discovery, and today researchers across the UW — in the College of Engineering, the College of Arts & Sciences and the Institute for Nano-Engineered Systems — are at the forefront of QIS research. The university recently established UW Quantum X to join QIS research endeavors across the UW in fields such as quantum sensing, quantum computing, quantum communication and quantum materials and devices. Co-chairs of UW Quantum X are Kai-Mei Fu, associate professor of both physics and electrical and computer engineering and a NanoES faculty member, and Jim Pfaendtner, associate professor and chair of chemical engineering. Fu and Pfaendtner were also co-organizers of the summit, along with counterparts at Microsoft and the PNNL.