NanoES

January 6, 2021

Accelerating AI computing to the speed of light

A UW research team led by associate professor Mo Li has developed an optical computing system that could contribute toward speeding up AI and machine learning while reducing associated energy and environmental costs.


November 16, 2020

A culture of collaboration

UW Bioengineering faculty pivot diagnostics research to support the need for COVID-19 testing. The Lutz and Yager labs have developed prototypes that deliver results in less than 30 minutes, and the groups have also assembled 35,000 tests for the Seattle Coronavirus Assessment Network at the NanoES building.


November 3, 2020

UW ECE, ME, CSE seek outstanding faculty candidates in quantum information science & technology

The University of Washington Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering seek outstanding candidates with expertise in quantum information science and technology to apply for new full-time faculty positions.


November 2, 2020

Break it up: Polymer derived from material in shrimp’s shells could deliver anti-cancer drugs to tumor sites

Earlier this year, UW scientists announced a nanoparticle-based drug delivery system that can ferry a potent anti-cancer drug through the bloodstream safely. The nanoparticle is derived from chitin, a natural and organic polymer that makes up the outer shells of shrimp.


October 6, 2020

All together now: Experiments with twisted 2D materials catch electrons behaving collectively

A patterned, layered device purple, yellow, and teal films. The pattern of purple material at the center resembles circuitry.

Some of the most ambitious goals in physics and materials research are to make ordinary-sounding objects with extraordinary properties: wires that can transport power without any energy loss, or quantum computers that can perform complex calculations that today’s computers cannot achieve. And the emerging workbenches for the experiments that gradually move us toward these goals are 2D materials — sheets of material that are a single layer of atoms thick.


October 1, 2020

NanoES faculty receive National Science Foundation award to increase capacity of quantum computing systems

Headshots of ECE professors Mo Li, Arka Majumdar and Karl Böhringer

A team led by UW Electrical & Computer Engineering professors Mo Li, Arka Majumdar and Karl Böhringer was selected to participate in the National Science Foundation’s Convergence Accelerator, a new initiative to accelerate use-inspired research addressing societal challenges. The team will be working to increase the capacity of quantum computing systems to retain and process information.


September 1, 2020

UW receives NSF funds for investment in an interdisciplinary quantum future

The National Science Foundation has awarded $3 million to establish a NSF Research Traineeship at the University of Washington for graduate students in quantum information science and technology. The new traineeship — known as Accelerating Quantum-Enabled Technologies, or AQET — will make the UW one of just a handful of universities with a formal, interdisciplinary QIST curriculum. NanoES member and professor of electrical & computer engineering and physics, Kai-Mei Fu, will direct this new traineeship.


August 24, 2020

UW nanotechnology infrastructure gets a boost from National Science Foundation

The National Science Foundation has awarded the University of Washington and Oregon State University a five-year, $5 million grant to advance nanoscale science, engineering, and technology research in the Pacific Northwest. Known as the Northwest Nanotechnology Infrastructure (NNI), the UW and OSU partnership is one of 16 sites in the NSF’s National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure (NNCI) program. NNCI sites provide researchers from academia and industry access to leading-edge fabrication and characterization tools at university facilities.


June 23, 2020

Laser allows solid-state refrigeration of a semiconductor material

A diagram showing the set up of an experiment for solid-state refrigeration using a laser.

A team led by NanoES faculty member Peter Pauzauskie used an infrared laser to cool a solid semiconductor by at least 20 degrees C, or 36 F, below room temperature, as they report in a paper published June 23 in Nature Communications.


June 19, 2020

Meeting the need for COVID-19 test kits: Pivoting from Seattle Flu Study and developing new rapid tests

UW SCAN swab kit assembly

Bioengineering professor Barry Lutz, in partnership with Dr. Matthew Thompson, a UW professor of family medicine and global health, is pioneering at home test kits for the Seattle Coronavirus Assessment Network to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read more about how the Lutz lab is developing new ways to rapidly test.


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