NanoES

Photonic & Quantum Devices

Integrated photonics promises to transform a wide range of applications including optical communication, quantum information processing, and biosensing. Integrated photonics combines photonic signal transmission, processing, and possible conversion to/from an electrical signal on a nanofabricated chip. These nanoscale photonic circuits are not only smaller, but also faster and more efficient compared to traditional electronic circuits.

NanoES research in this area is geared towards large-scale integrated networks of photonic devices for cutting edge optical communication and quantum computing as well as single photonic devices for biosensing in health-related diagnostics.

Integrated Networks of Photonics Devices

The development of large-scale photonic networks will transform both classical and quantum information processing by surpassing the current limits in both speed and bandwidth of classical electronic circuits. For quantum applications, the photon is the most robust link between quantum processing nodes.

(Right) Integrated photonic device that controls the frequency of single quantum emitters developed by Kai-Mei Fu's group and published in Nano Letters.

(Above) Blood phenotyping platform based on nanofabricated silicon photonics developed by Dan Ratner's Lab.

Nanoscale Photonics-Based Sensors

Nanoscale photonics-based sensors, capable of single molecule and single cell detection, are becoming practical with massively parallelized devices. The miniaturization and integration of photonics in medical devices is facilitating the development of new, minimally invasive health diagnostics.

Fabricating Nanoscale Photonic Devices

The Washington Nanofabrication Facility (WNF) at UW is uniquely equipped to facilitate the creation of complex, cutting-edge nanoscale photonic devices. Key instruments available at WNF include a JEOL electron beam lithography system and a Nanoscribe ultra-high-resolution 3D printer.

Faculty Members

Karl Böhringer

Director of the Institute for Nano-Engineered Systems;
Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering and of Bioengineering

karlb@uw.edu | Website

Kai-Mei Fu

Associate Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering and of Physics
kaimeifu@uw.edu | Website 

Mo Li

Associate Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering and of Physics
moli96@uw.edu | Website

Lih Lin

Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering
lylin@uw.edu | Website

Arka Majumdar

Assistant Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering and of Physics
arka@uw.edu | Website

David Masiello

Associate Professor of Chemistry
masiello@uw.edu | Website

Peter Pauzauskie

Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering
peterpz@uw.edu | Website

Dan Ratner

Associate Professor of Bioengineering
dratner@uw.edu | Website

Xiaodong Xu

Professor of Materials Science and Engineering
xuxd@uw.edu | Website