NanoES

Integrated Photonics


Integrated photonics range from large-scale networks of photonic devices to single photonic sensors in health-related diagnostics. Nanophotonic and nanoelectronic devices and materials promise to provide new means of compact image generation as well as intelligent information processing. This is done via controlling physics at the sub-micron level creating dramatic new means of accessing and controlling photons, charge transport and “spin”.

May 3, 2019

Researchers take a bottom-up approach to synthesizing microscopic diamonds for bioimaging, quantum computing

NanoES faculty member Peter Pauzauskie and his team discovered that they can use extremely high pressure and temperature to introduce other elements into nanodiamonds, making them potentially useful in cell and tissue imaging, as well as quantum communications and quantum sensing. This work was done in collaboration with the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and published in Science Advances on May 3.


January 3, 2019

NanoES Faculty Profile: Peter Pauzauskie

Peter Pauzauskie, Materials Science & Engineering professor and NanoES faculty member, synthesizes nanoscale materials for potential applications in next-generation quantum sensors, biomedical devices, and solid-state laser refrigeration. The Pauzauskie Research Group maintains office space, a wet lab for nanocrystal synthesis, and a lab for laser spectroscopy experiments in the NanoES building.


November 14, 2018

Scientists engineer a functional optical lens out of 2D materials

In a paper published Oct. 8 in the journal Nano Letters, a team from the University of Washington and the National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan announced that it has constructed functional metalenses that are one-tenth to one-half the thickness of the wavelengths of light that they focus. Their metalenses, which were constructed out of layered 2D materials, were as thin as 190 nanometers — less than 1/100,000ths of an inch thick.


July 22, 2017

UW team develops fast, cheap method to make supercapacitor electrodes for electric cars, high-powered lasers | UW News

Supercapacitors are an aptly named type of device that can store and deliver energy faster than conventional batteries. They are in high demand for applications including electric cars, wireless telecommunications and high-powered lasers.