NanoES

Integrated Photonics


Integrated photonics range from large-scale networks of photonic devices to single photonic sensors in health-related diagnostics. Nanophotonic and nanoelectronic devices and materials promise to provide new means of compact image generation as well as intelligent information processing. This is done via controlling physics at the sub-micron level creating dramatic new means of accessing and controlling photons, charge transport and “spin”.

April 14, 2020

Optics startup Tunoptix wins federal grant to develop metalenses for imaging satellites at Washington Nanofabrication Facility

A portion of the team’s experimental setup for capturing an image using a metalens. The researchers capture an image of flowers through a metalens (mounted on a microscope slide) and visualize it through a microscope.

Tunoptix, an optics startup co-founded by University of Washington (UW) electrical and computer engineering professors Karl Böhringer and Arka Majumdar, was awarded $223,000 in Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop metasurface lenses (or metalenses) for imaging in satellites at the UW Washington Nanofabrication Facility.


October 4, 2019

New metasurface design can control optical fields in three dimensions

A team led by NanoES faculty member Arka Majumdar, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering and physics, has designed and tested a 3D-printed metamaterial that can manipulate light with nanoscale precision. As they report in a paper published October 4 in the journal Science Advances, their designed optical element focuses light to discrete points in a 3D helical pattern. Designing optical fields in three dimensions could enable creation of ultra-compact depth sensors for self-driving cars, as well as improved components for virtual- or augmented-reality headsets.


August 2, 2019

Defects Wanted; Apply Here – Q&A with physicist Kai-Mei Fu

NanoES faculty member and professor of electrical engineering and physics recently sat down with APS Physics. Kai-Mei studies the properties of atomic defects in materials with the goal of using these normally unwanted flaws to create quantum technologies for secure communication. She is also the co-chair of QuantumX, a University of Washington initiative seeking to facilitate and support activities that will accelerate quantum discoveries and technologies


July 23, 2019

First-ever visualizations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure could lead to longer-lasting devices

UW physicists David Cobden and Xiaodong Xu, in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Warwick, developed a technique to measure the energy and momentum of electrons in operating microelectronic devices made of atomically thin — so-called 2D — materials. Their findings, published last week in the journal Nature could lead to new, finely tuned, high-performance electronic devices.


May 3, 2019

Researchers take a bottom-up approach to synthesizing microscopic diamonds for bioimaging, quantum computing

NanoES faculty member Peter Pauzauskie and his team discovered that they can use extremely high pressure and temperature to introduce other elements into nanodiamonds, making them potentially useful in cell and tissue imaging, as well as quantum communications and quantum sensing. This work was done in collaboration with the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and published in Science Advances on May 3.


January 3, 2019

Design, synthesis, and integration of quantum nanoscale materials

Peter Pauzauskie, Materials Science & Engineering professor and NanoES faculty member, synthesizes nanoscale materials for potential applications in next-generation quantum sensors, biomedical devices, and solid-state laser refrigeration. The Pauzauskie Research Group maintains office space, a wet lab for nanocrystal synthesis, and a lab for laser spectroscopy experiments in the NanoES building.


November 14, 2018

Scientists engineer a functional optical lens out of 2D materials

In a paper published Oct. 8 in the journal Nano Letters, a team from the University of Washington and the National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan announced that it has constructed functional metalenses that are one-tenth to one-half the thickness of the wavelengths of light that they focus. Their metalenses, which were constructed out of layered 2D materials, were as thin as 190 nanometers — less than 1/100,000ths of an inch thick.


July 22, 2017

UW team develops fast, cheap method to make supercapacitor electrodes for electric cars, high-powered lasers | UW News

Supercapacitors are an aptly named type of device that can store and deliver energy faster than conventional batteries. They are in high demand for applications including electric cars, wireless telecommunications and high-powered lasers.